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Oncology

Font C, Farrús B, Vidal L et al.  Ann Oncol 2011;22:2101–6.

The present study investigated, in a prospective manner, the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of cancer patients with newly diagnosed venous thromboembolism (VTE) according to the presence or absence of symptoms. The study included patients diagnosed with solid tumors who either incidentally or because of VTE-related symptoms were diagnosed with a VTE. Patients with asymptomatic VTE were older, were more likely to have metastatic disease, and were less likely to receive chemotherapy after the detection of the thrombotic event compared with patients who had symptomatic VTE. Regarding the vascular territory involved among patients with incidental VTE, the most frequent clinical presentations were pulmonary embolism, thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, and iliac vein thrombosis. A lower risk of recurrent VTE was observed in asymptomatic patients.

 

Cancer is frequently complicated by venous thromboembolism (VTE). Anticoagulant therapy for VTE in cancer patients is more challenging because of a higher incidence of recurrent thrombotic as well as bleeding events. The widespread use of continuously progressing imaging diagnostic techniques has resulted in an increase in the diagnosis of incidental or asymptomatic VTE. Although recent guidelines recommend the same anticoagulant treatment for asymptomatic VTE, there is a paucity of data regarding the benefits and safety of this approach in cancer patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of cancer patients with newly diagnosed VTE according to the presence or absence of symptoms.

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